Dwarfare Games

Dwarfare Games

We are a publisher of tabletop roleplaying games through DrivethruRPG. We have been publishing Dungeon World supplements for just over a year now and we are currently working on our own tabletop rpg system called Chimera. In this short time, we have managed to create over 20 products, including blank maps to be purchased and as cartography commissions.

  • Santo Domingo, Dominican republic.
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Our Products

This is the number of supplements and original content that we have created so far.

Dungeon World 22 Products
Cartography 6 Products
Chimera System Rulebook 1 Product












Chimera Cover

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Chimera is a tabletop roleplaying engine suited to run fantasy, modern, and sci-fi themed games. Chimera uses flexible rules that allow you to put the fiction first, but with enough crunch to add more structure to the resolution mechanics if you so wish. In essence, playing Chimera is a conversation where:
• The Game Master describes the environment.
• The players describe what their characters do.
• The GM picks the most relevant abilities and asks the players to roll.
• The player rolls a ten-sided die per rank in the relevant abilities & chooses the highest.
• The GM takes in the results & narrates the outcome of the character's actions.

The book is divided into two parts that contain chapters of various lengths.

Part 1

The following chapters are designed for both PCs and GMs.
Learn to Play: Everything you need to know about the rules that make up the Chimera Roleplaying System is found in this chapter. Make sure you read this first.
Characters: This chapter goes over everything related to character creation, character development, filling a character sheet, and how to build certain archetypes.
Races & Traits: The races & Traits chapter contains information about the races you can play in fantasy, modern, and sci-fi settings.
Perks: The perks chapter contains abilities that you can take that help you improve and expand the capabilities of your character.
Powers: All the rules regarding powers and those who wield them are found in this chapter.
Wealth & Equipment: This chapter goes over the abstract system of owning Resources and Wealth, as well as equipment, and the services you can acquire with them.

Part 2

It only contains three chapters, but these are crucial for any aspiring GM.
Game Mastering: This long chapter goes over what is to be a GM, tips I have found useful throughout my years as a GM, and a toolbox for creating adventures, campaigns, and character options.
Enemies: This chapter contains an assortment of creatures to pit against the PCs in your game.
Example Setting: This chapter holds the notes of a small campaign setting hurriedly put together to test how well all Chimera elements worked collectively.

This chimeric beast heavily draws inspiration and mechanics from games such as Apocalypse World, games derived from the d20 system, Dungeon World, and Fate Core. You can see these influences in the core mechanics of the game.
Dice Pool: The Chimera Roleplaying System uses ten-sided dice to determine the success or failure of actions and circumstances presented during the game. Your dice pool is the number of dice you are allowed to roll to resolve a task's outcome. Your pool is composed of your ranks in the appropriate abilities (Action + Approach).
Abilities: Abilities are the bread and butter of all characters. They define what a character can or can't do and how well they can do it. Actions represent the overall capabilities of your character to get things done. If actions are what you can do, the approach represents how you get things done. A situation might have different approaches, and you get to choose how things get done.
When To Roll: Whenever the outcome of a task is uncertain and has some real consequences, it is time to gather your dice and roll. As a player, you will make most of the rolls in the game.
What To Roll: To determine the outcome of your character's action, you roll a d10 per rank in the relevant abilities to form your dice pool. You roll and keep the highest die of them all.
Degrees of Success: How well or bad you do will depend on your result when you roll to determine a task's outcome. When you roll to determine an outcome and have at least a ten, it counts as a success. If the highest die from your roll is a nine, it counts as a partial success. If you roll and your result has no 10s or 9s, it counts as a failure.

In Chimera, you follow ten steps to build your character, allowing you to choose essential aspects of your avatar such as their background, race, extraordinary abilities called perks, their principles and goals, and their gear.
Race: Each race has a list of inherent and optional traits and perks to choose from to tailor your character to your needs. If the options presented do not suit you, the game has optional rules to implement that allows you to choose the traits that best fit your character, regardless of race.
Perks: They can help you boost something you are already capable of doing or let you do things impossible for others, such as casting spells. You can spend XP to learn any perk you want as long as you meet the requirements and take some downtime to do it.
Equipment: Select from a vast selection of gear and services to build your character. Equipment can be enhanced in many ways. They can be made from different materials, possess other gadgets to increase versatility, refined craftsmanship to strengthen protection, or resist different types of damage such as ballistic and energy. Want to make a laser sword? Buy a sword and pay for the concealable and energy modifications, and you are good to go!
Wealth: Chimera uses an abstract wealth mechanic where the minutiae of keeping track of everything owned, bought, and how much money you have left isn't important. It can be used in any game, be it a fantasy, modern, or sci-fi setting where there is a fairly standard economy. It could also be used in an apocalyptic setting where keeping track of every resource you have left and living on the edge is part of the game's focus. It all depends on the interpretation given to wealth, as explained in the sections below.

GM Toolkit: This book contains chapters aimed to help the game master know what their role is, understand their agenda, arbitrate the rules, and run the game. All delivered in a condensed manner for an easy read. It also includes guides to create adventures, campaigns, enemies, curses, diseases, and traps, give rewards, create character options, numerous optional rules, enemies to pit against players, and an example campaign setting.
Sell Your Stuff: Got a new awesome adventure, campaign setting, character option, enemy, optional rule, or cool supplement in general that you want to publish? Do it! As long as your content is original, you can sell it under a creative commons license!
Any Type Of Art: From elavorate illustrations to simple vector art, this book contains tons of example for artwork that you could immitate for your products.

Got a new awesome adventure, campaign setting, character option, enemy, optional rule, or cool supplement in general that you want to publish and sell? Click here to learn more.

  • CHIMERA EXCERPT - Enemy Creation

    CHIMERA EXCERPT - Enemy Creation



    Today I bring you an excerpt from the Game Mastering chapter as it is currently seen in the playtest document my group has.

    Creating Enemies

    Whether you're sitting down to prepare enemies before a session or if you are coming up with them as you play along (as I usually do), you need to have a clear idea of what the monster looks like, its name, what it can do, where it lives and how is the enemy impacting its environment (or you can think about these things later if the player characters are going to kill it right away). Once you have that, all you need to do is choose its role which will determine its core stats, then, give it 2 or 3 special qualities if they are appropriate for the creature such as flying, swimming, or seeing in the dark. Give it at least one form of attack and you are set. We will go over below to help you make your own. Luckily, enemies on chapter XX are presented in a format that makes them easy to use right off the bat and which can also give you plenty of ideas of how you can make or modify your own enemies. Keep in mind that not all enemies match this formula 100%. Treat the steps below as guidelines rather than a strict form of creating enemies.

    Enemy Name & Description

    Think about what the enemy is commonly called in the world your game takes place in and write a small description about it's origins, white drives this particular enemy, where it lives and how is the enemy impacting its environment, and finally what it looks like. In settings where the creature type matters for the purpose of genetic tagging, magic item wielding, and powers and effects related to creature origin, it is best to give it a creature type such as animal, dragon, elemental, fey, humanoid, plant, and undead.

    Enemy Role

    An enemy can be classified as a MinionElite, or Boss. Each role while set their Attributes and Health. It will also give you other statistics like how much damage they do when they attack or for ongoing effects, the number of special traits it should have and of attacks. Choose an enemy role from the ones presented below:

    Minion

    Minions are enemies that alone don't pose much of a threat to a combat oriented character and usually go down with a well landed hit or two. However, in large groups minions can pose a thread towards characters of any tier. Minions usually have the following statistics:
    • Attributes: 5, 5, 3 (distributed among Might, Agility, and Cunning).
    • Health: 9
    • Wounds: 4
    • Special Traits: 1 or 2.
    • Attacks: 1 or 2 forms of attack.
    • Damage: +3 of the weapon's type. +3 for ongoing damage.

    Elite

    Elite enemies are tougher than minions and a single elite enemy can be a significant threat to any character. Elite enemies are usually found in pairs or leading a small group of minion enemies. Elites usually have the following statistics:
    • Attributes: 5, 5, 7 (distributed among Might, Agility, and Cunning).
    • Health: 12
    • Wounds: 6
    • Special Traits: Up to 3.
    • Attacks: Up to 3 forms of attack.
    • Damage: +4 of the weapon's type. +3 for ongoing damage.

    Boss

    Boss enemies are creatures capable of taking a group of player characters on their own. Boss enemies are tougher than all other enemies (save for other bosses), and have a large repertoire of traits and abilities. Bosses usually have the following statistics:
    • Attributes: 5, 7, 7 (distributed among Might, Agility, and Cunning).
    • Health: 15
    • Wounds: 12
    • Special Traits: Up to 4.
    • Attacks: Up to 5 forms of attack.
    • Damage: +6 of the weapon's type. +4 for ongoing damage.

    Enemy Size

    How big is your enemy? Choose a size from the ones listed below:

    Diminutive

    Diminutive creatures are only a few inches tall and usually pose a thread when they group to form a swarm. Diminutive creatures normally need to be on top of their target to attack in melee. 

    Tiny

    Tiny creatures usually don't stand above  1’5’’ feet (0.4 meters) and don't weigh that much. Tiny creatures are usually unable to wield weapons not made for their size and carrying any object bigger or heavier than they are will prove highly difficult if not imposible. Tiny creatures normally need to be on top of their target to attack in melee. 

    Small

    Small creatures usually don't stand above 4 feet (1.2 meters) and barely weigh more than 100 pounds (45 kilograms). Small creatures normally are not able to wield two-handed weapons.

    Medium

    Medium creatures usually don't stand above 7 feet (2 meters) and can weigh up to 500 pounds (226 kilograms).

    Large

    Large creatures usually don't stand above 15 feet (4.5 meters) and can weigh up to a ton or two. Large creatures generally have the following traits:
    •  Reach with their melee attacks against smaller creatures.
    • +3 Health.
    • +1 Damage.

    Huge

    Huge creatures usually don't stand above 30 feet (9 meters) and can weigh several tons. Huge creatures generally have the following traits:
    • Reach with their melee attacks against smaller creatures.
    • +6 Health.
    • +2 Damage.

    Colossal

    Colossal creatures can stand above 50 feet (12 meters) and can weigh tens if not hundreds of tons. Colossal creatures generally have the following traits:
    • Reach with their melee attacks against smaller creatures.
    • +9 Health.
    • +3 Damage.

    Enemy Defense

    What sort of protection does your enemy has? Choose one:
    • Cloth or Flesh: 0 Armor.
    • Light armor, casing, or hide: +1 Armor.
    • Medium armor, casing, or hide: +2 Armor.
    • Heavy armor, casing, or hide: +3 Armor.
    • Magical or Power armor, casing, or hide: +4 Armor.
    What can its armor protect it against? Choose all that apply:
    • It can stop bullets: +Ballistic.
    • It can stop energy weapons: +Energy.

    Enemy Offense

    How does the enemy usually attacks with? Choose all that apply for each form of attack:
    • It can make melee attacks: + Ranged (Close).
    • It's attack Keeps others at bay: +Reach.
    • It can make ranged attacks (bows, pistols, powers):  +Range (Near, Far, or Extreme).
    • It's attacks are vicious: +2 damage.
    • They can slice through rock: +1 Penetrating, +Messy.
    • They can slice through thick rock and metal: +2 Penetrating, +Messy.
    • They can slice through rock, metal, and high tech or magical armor: +3 Penetrating, +Messy.

    Enemy Traits

    What is the enemy best known for? Choose all that apply or make up your own.
    • Adaptable: It has useful adaptations like seeing in the dark, flying, or swimming. Choose as many as the role suggests.
    • Controller: It has a knack for crowd control. Write a special attack that helps it hinder its opponents.
    • Defender: When it defends an object or place, attackers have Disadvantage while trying to get through it.
    • Devious: It always has a trick up its sleeves.
    • Immunity: It is immune to one or more types of damage. Creatures with immunities are usually vulnerable to other types of damage.
    • Leader: It leads minions into battle. -3 Health. Write a special attack or trait that buffs its allies.
    • Multi-Attacker: It can make up to three attacks to the same target or distributed among many.
    • Powerful: +2 damage, +Forceful.
    • Rechargeable: It has a powerful attack. Write a special attack that has a chance to recharge each round when you roll a 4 or higher on a . The attack deals +3 damage of what the enemy is normally capable of or has a very strong effect.
    • Resistant: It is resistant to one or more types of damage.
    • Terrifying: It's mere presence sends its enemies into panic. Write a special attack to represent this.
    • Vigorous: +3 Health.
    • Vulnerable: It is vulnerable to one or more types of damage. Creatures with vulnerabilities are usually immune to other types of damage.
    • Wielder: It can manifest powers. Write one or two powers it can manifest.

    Enemy Tactics

    Next write a short paragraph explaining how the enemy behaves when it find itself in particular situations such as when another creature grabs what it is trying to protect, when it grabs a target, when it becomes wounded, or what it does when outnumbered.

    Putting It All Together

    Lets go through the process of making an enemy step by step. For this example, I want to make a robot that serves as the guardian of a facility. I want it to be large and bulky enough that it can take the entire party on its own. Now that I have my enemy concept, lets jump right into the creation process.

    Enemy Name & Description

    I have decided to call my enemy Juggernaut Defender, it is an imposing, self explaining name in my opinion.  The juggernaut will be in charge of protecting a large facility that the player characters will try to gain access to.

    Enemy Role

    Since I want it to be able to take an entire group of player characters, I will go with the Boss role. I am putting the two highest stats on Might and Willpower, the juggernaut is strong, has a well-encrypted computing system, and excellent surveillance equipment, but it is not that fast.  Might (7), Agility (5), Willpower (7). Its Health starts at 15, and gets a Wound when it reaches 7 of Health. It can have up to 4 special traits and up to 5 forms of attack. Its damage starts at +6 of the weapon's type. and effects that deal ongoing damage coming from it start at +4.

    Enemy Size

    My juggernaut is exactly 15 feet tall and weighs almost a ton, so, I will go with the Large size. My juggernaut gains the Reach property, a +3 Health which brings it up to 18, and deals +1 Damage, bringing it up to +7.

    Enemy Defense

    My juggernaut has really thick plates that protect from all sort of attacks, I'll give power armor type of protection, it +4 Armor, +Ballistic, +Energy. There isn't anything going through that armor.

    Enemy Offense

    I'll give it a melee attack that I will call Punch, written down as follows. Punch; +7 Crushing, Range (Close). A fist of that size can definitely go through stone, so I will give it the it can slice through rock option which gives it +1 Penetrating, +Messy. I will also give it a ranged attack I will cal Wrist Laser, written down as follows. Wrist Laser; +7 Energy, Range 
    (close, near).

    Enemy Traits

    My enemy's role suggests it should have up to 4 traits so I will do my best to stick to that number. First, I think seeing in the dark is important for a guardian robot and also the ability to fly, for this reason I will give it Adaptable: Flight, Nightvision as special traits. Since it is a robot, I think it should be vulnerable to electricity (as seen in many comic, games, and movies). Thus, I add Vulnerabilities:  Shocking Damage.

    Since I am only adding a vulnerability without adding any sort of resistance or immunity, I'll go ahead and give my robot a powerful area attack. I don't want it to use the attack every round so I will choose the Rechargeable special trait that lets me write a special attack that allows me to roll a die each round to see if the attack recharges. Lastly, since my robot is meant to take a group of heroes on its own and defend a place, I will add the Defender trait.

    Tactics

    This section allows me to write how my enemy behaves in specific situations, be it a series of short phrases or a couple of long ones. The point is to give me as the GM cues as to how I should play this enemy and find interesting ways to describe how my juggernaut goes about applying them in the battlefield. I have written the following tactics for my robot:
    • Blast a large group of opponent with Energy Blast before they scatter.
    • Grab the weakest opponent and crush it in its fist, dealing damage each round.
    • Use it’s Defender trait when one or multiple targets get close to the facility.

    The Result

    This is how my enemy looks like after adding everything together:


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